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Lathrop isn’t ruling out congressional race

By   /   November 27, 2012  /   4 Comments

Omaha Sen. Steve Lathrop told Nebraska Watchdog he isn’t ruling anything out regarding his political plans in 2014 – including a possible run for Congress.

Omaha Sen. Steve Lathrop is considering a run for govenor but also hasn’t ruled out a run for other offices.

Lathrop has previously said he’s very interested in running for governor in 2014. The Democrat seriously considered running for the U.S. Senate this year, but ultimately decided against it.

Now there’s some speculation that this month’s election results may nudge him in the direction of a congressional race, given the fact that even a big name candidate like Bob Kerrey struggled in a statewide race.

“I keep hearing that and I don’t know the basis for that,” Lathrop said Monday, but added, “I haven’t ruled anything out. I don’t feel obliged to make a decision right away. I’ve spent a good deal of time talking to different people about how I might serve when my term is up.”

In February, Lathrop said he preferred the environment of the state capitol over the hyperpartisan atmosphere in Congress.

And while he was sounding more like a gubernatorial candidate as recently as September, now he’s leaving enough wiggle room to change his mind. Regarding a possible run for Congress, he said, “People have talked about that. I’ve had some people talk to me about it.”

One thing is for certain, he said: “I enjoy this type of service.”

Already in the race for governor are two Republicans Lathrop calls friends: Lt. Gov. Rick Sheehy and Speaker Mike Flood.

Lathrop was elected to the Legislature in 2006, re-elected in 2010 and will be term-limited out of the Legislature in 2014. He is perhaps best known for his work chairing the Developmental Disabilities Special Investigative Committee, which worked to improve the quality of care for people with developmental disabilities, particularily at the state home in Beatrice.

Contact Deena Winter at deena@nebraskawatchdog.org.

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Deena Winter is a reporter for NebraskaWatchdog.org. Contact her at deena@nebraskawatchdog.org and follow her on Twitter @DeenaNEWatchdog.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1511775327 Michael Carnes

    As a Democrat, Lathrop has little chance for governor and no chance for Congress. If he’s going to run for governor, he might want to buck the Nebraska Democrats’ SOP and announce now, rather than waiting until after the Valentines Day before the next election. I hate to break it to the Nebraska Democrats, but name recognition is very helpful, especially if the candidate actually lives within the state’s borders.

  • LukeinNE

    Really? I think it would be the opposite. His name recognition is far higher in Omaha than it is the rest of the state. The second district is also the only remotely competitive area of the state. Terry almost lost month, so he’s not invincible. Statewide races in this state are almost unwinnable for Democrats anymore.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jon.rehm2 Jon Rehm

    Nebraska Democrats need to stop defeating themselves before the game starts. If Lathrop gets in in the first part of 2013 he has a chance. I’m glad North Dakota Democrats didn’t write off Heidi Heidekamp two years before the election. Lathrop would be especially strong if some clown like Charlie Janssen or Jon Bruning won the GOP Primary.

  • LukeinNE

    We’ll have to agree to disagree on this. I’m a Republican living in the Tri City area. Out of about 400 votes cast at my precinct I was one of seven (7!) people who voted for Romney and Kerrey. The country is so polarized, in a state like Nebraska, it hardly matters who is running anymore.
    The path to victory for the Democrats in this state involves winning all of the Democrats, independents by at least 2 to 1 and around 20% of Republicans. That is very, very hard to do, and is even harder to do due to aforementioned polarization.

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