Josh Peterson is a DC-based tech reporter for the Franklin Center's Watchdog.org news site. Peterson previously spent two years at The Daily Caller covering tech and telecom regulatory policy as the publication's Tech Editor. During that time, he focused on cybersecurity, privacy, civil liberties, and intellectual property issues, and in addition to covering political protest movements. Prior to joining The Daily Caller in October 2011, Peterson spent time in DC researching and reporting on technology issues in internship roles with Hillsdale College's Kirby Center, Broadband Breakfast and The National Journalism Center, and The Heritage Foundation. Peterson has a B.A. in Religion and Philosophy from Hillsdale College. He is also a musician and music enthusiast, and an avid martial artist.

Climate change squabble torches Google-ALEC relations

By   /  September 26, 2014  /  Energy and Environment, National, News, Technology  /  No Comments

Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Google (left) in conversation with Nik Gowing (November 25, 2013) 

Photo Credit: Chatham House (Flickr, Creative Commons https://flic.kr/p/hQyyQJ)

Over 150 state lawmakers are firing back at Google for claims made by the company’s executive chairman, billionaire Eric Schmidt, the lawmakers say are based on “misinformation from climate activists who intentionally confuse free market policy perspectives for climate change denial.”

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Google keeps low profile in support of net neutrality movement

By   /  September 23, 2014  /  National, News, Technology  /  No Comments

NET NEUTRALITY:  A coalition of Internet companies and progressive advocacy groups are pushing net neutrality regulations to mitigate fears of cable companies extorting customers. Google quietly encouraged supporters via a recent email to promote net neutrality.

Photo Credit: Battle for the Net (https://www.battleforthenet.com/sept10th/)

Following criticism from progressive groups for its low-profile support of net neutrality over the past several years, Google recently emailed supporters attempting to kill doubts on where it stood on the issue.

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Net neutrality fight sets stage for telecom law update

By   /  September 22, 2014  /  National, News, Politics, Public Utilities, Regulations, Technology  /  No Comments

Shutterstock image

 
By Josh Peterson | Watchdog.org
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Federal lawmakers already are beginning to look beyond the 2014 midterm elections, and the fight to turn the Internet into a public utility could be setting the stage for a revamp of telecommunication law in the new Congress.
Talk of modernizing the Telecommunications Act of 1996, or ’96 Act, was on [...]

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A vision for a la carte ‘local choice’ TV still alive on Capitol Hill

By   /  September 17, 2014  /  National, News, Politics, Technology  /  No Comments

LOCAL CHOICE: TV has been an important communication tool for American consumers over the past several decades. The recent fights between the cable, satellite and broadcaster networks is forcing lawmakers to think differently about rising consumer prices. 

"New TV on a showroom floor in Tallahassee, Florida" (November 20, 1957). Photo Credit: State Library and Archives of Florida, floridamemory.com/items/show/261076

Concerns about higher consumer prices if cable and satellite customers could unsubscribe from local channels they didn’t watch stalled a move on Capitol Hill to create a la carte local TV. But the proposal’s champions are fighting to keep the idea alive.

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Battle over Internet narratives at the FCC rages onward

By   /  September 16, 2014  /  National, News, Technology  /  No Comments

AP photo

The Federal Communications Commission received over 3 million comments regarding its authority over the nation’s Internet as the latest special interest battle at the agency concluded Monday.

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DHS: EMP threat ‘very much on our radar screen’

By   /  September 12, 2014  /  National, National Security, News, Technology  /  No Comments

POWER GRID: Photo Credit: freephotosbank.com

The exchange was short, taking up less than two minutes of a two-hour Senate hearing Wednesday.

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