William Patrick is a reporter for Watchdog.org. Contact him at wpatrick@watchdog.org and follow him on Twitter @WillPatrick77.

Watchdog Podcasts: In Our Backyards — Property taxes prop up mass transit

By   /  April 2, 2015  /  Florida, Podcast, transportation, Watchdog Radio  /  No Comments

In-Our-Backyards32

By Ben Yount and Will Patrick | Watchdog Radio
This is “In Our Backyards,” Watchdog.org’s podcast that examines local government — because the government that is the closest to you often can be the most important, even if you don’t hear much about it.
We’ll look at city councils, school boards and even water treatment authorities, because […]

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Congress may bring costly Amtrak service back to North Florida

By   /  April 2, 2015  /  Florida, News  /  No Comments

wikimedia commons

“No Amtrak long-distance train covers its operating costs. None even come close,” Randal O’Toole, a transit expert and Cato Institute scholar, told Watchdog.

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Florida union-led school choice lawsuit suffers setback

By   /  March 30, 2015  /  Florida, News  /  No Comments

AP file photo

A founding member of a teachers’ union-led lawsuit announced Friday that it’s dropping out of an effort to kill a popular school choice program.

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Hop aboard: Tampa Bay-area transit authority wants to raise property taxes

By   /  March 27, 2015  /  Florida, News  /  No Comments

Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority

Despite sparse attendance, the details of a new transit plan will affect hundreds of thousands of taxpayers in a Tampa Bay-area county.

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Florida solar amendment on the rise despite free-market concerns

By   /  March 26, 2015  /  Florida, News  /  No Comments

U.S. Department of Energy

Breaking the public utilities’ solar monopoly is one thing, but what comes next?

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Florida officials back off land restriction, thanks to property-rights watchdog

By   /  March 23, 2015  /  Florida, News  /  No Comments

FloridaFish

After almost two years of uncertainty and intense legal wrangling, local officials in Southeast Florida won’t end up imposing $1,000 daily fines against a small business. Its alleged crime? Violating a decades’ old environmental restriction that regulators never recorded.

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